Sportradar and KNVB to snuff out match-fixing in Dutch football

Switzerland-headquartered sporting analytics company Sportradar has teamed up with the KNVB, which oversees football in the Netherlands. 

Together, the duo will plan to fight against match-fixing in football across the country using several tools. 

Details of the deal 

Sportradar already has an existing partnership with the KNVB. On top of that, it works closely with several footballing bodies — such as FIFA and UEFA. 

The improved partnership between Sportradar and the KNVB will span across multiple years. Using data available on the deep and dark webs, as well as to the public eye, Sportradar will inform the association if it sees anything that is potentially worrying. 

Some of the areas that will be analysed include: 

  • Match manipulation and corruption 
  • Irregular betting patterns 

KNVB Integrity Officer Jan Peter Dogge said: 

“We are confident that this partnership will put us in the strongest possible position to uphold the integrity of our competitions. 

“The KNVB takes the threat of match-fixing and other sporting corruption extremely seriously, and we recognise the experience and depth of knowledge which Sportradar possesses in this field.”

Combatting match-fixing in sport

Sportradar’s Integrity Services will look after identifying possible signs of match-fixing and warn the KNVB. Commenting on the new agreement, Andreas Krannich — Managing Director for Integrity Services — said: 

“Corruption in sport lives beyond match-fixing, and the importance of robust due diligence measures that touch every area of business cannot be underestimated. 

“The evolving threats of match manipulation and other sporting corruption highlight the need for a constant and proactive approach to tackling potential integrity issues.

“Working with our Intelligence and Investigation services team, the KNVB has shown a commendable commitment to protecting the integrity of Dutch football.”

Match-fixing in Dutch sports 

In May 2021, police in the Netherlands launched an investigation looking at potential spot-fixing bets. They were alerted after a gambler won significant money on a player receiving yellow cards during a match in the Eredivisie.  

Police were alerted because the booked player in question hadn’t received a booking in the 2020/2021 season until then. The individual who won the money picked up thousands of Euros. 

A player was investigated but has denied involvement. His club, Sparta Rotterdam, said he would be available for selection for that season’s remaining games. A spokesperson said: 

“Until the investigation is concluded, this situation will have no bearing on team selection for the upcoming matches.”

Meanwhile, a tennis player from the country said that various Dutch professionals in the sport cooperate with match-fixers regularly. 

Anne De Louw, a prosecutor in the Netherlands, spoke about the individual’s claims. She said: 

“Being a top tennis player costs so much that it is almost a risk factor for match-fixing.

“In the Netherlands, we have dozens of professional tennis players, but there are only a few who can really earn a good living from that. For the rest, it is hard work and costs a lot of money. So the danger lurks more quickly when you can create an alternative revenue model for yourself to be able to continue practising your sport.”